Toiletries and beauty

Cruelty Free Toiletries and Beauty Products

No one wants to use toiletries that have caused injury, harm and misery to animals in the testing process yet many big brands are not cruelty free.

What can I do?

Cruelty Free shopping is easy! The Leaping Bunny logo is the only way you can be sure you are buying truly ‘cruelty-free’ beauty products. So whether it is shower gel, shampoo, a moisturiser or a new bottle of nail varnish, check it has the logo on it.

Budget

Super Drug, the Co-operative, Marks and Spencer, Morrisons, Sainsbury and the Body Shop all have own brands which carry this logo. So it’s easy to swap to cruelty free while you are doing your weekly shop.

Mid-price

Faith in Nature British-made, cruelty free and vegan skin care, hair care and body products. Online and in health food shops.

Bull dog skincare for men a great range of products for men and vegan too. Available in Boots, other retailers and online.

Liz Earle has a huge range of products for face and body as well as make up.

This is just a tiny selection of what is available. For a full list of leaping bunny approved suppliers see www.gocrueltyfree.org/shopper

What about the EU ban on animal testing?

The BUAV, founder organisation of Cruelty Free International, and its partners at the European Coalition to End Animal Experiments have been instrumental in achieving a European ban on animal testing for cosmetic and toiletry products and ingredients. However, even now the ban has come into force (from 11 March 2013), the Leaping Bunny continues to be the only way consumers can be sure they are buying truly ‘cruelty-free’ beauty products.

The ban means that companies are no longer able to animal test new cosmetic products and ingredients on sale in the EU. However, companies can still carry on animal testing cosmetics outside the EU where these cosmetics are also sold outside the EU. There are a number of issues for companies selling their products on the global market. For example, at present, before new products can go on sale in China, they must be submitted for testing to the Chinese authorities, which normally involves a range of animal tests.

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